Friday, May 23, 2014

If





If

By:Rudyard Kipling(poetryfoundation.org)
Image/s by:(briantracy.com)

(‘Brother Square-Toes’—Rewards and Fairies)

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:


If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:


If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’


If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!


continue reading "If"

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Stress





Stress

By:mia gerstad(storystar.com)
Image/s by:(health.com)

Don’t panic, breathe. Don’t stress. I've got to find a gift for her, come on. What a horrible smell, puke. She will probably just give me soap, anyway. It’s getting dark outside. Make up? Does she like blue, dark green, purple? Maybe I could get her a sandwich, don’t be daft, oh, I should have eaten. Those bottles of shampoo are staring at me. Jingle bells... I’m getting dizzy, so many things, big, small, huge. I should be working on my essay; no, I need to find her that gift. I know what she likes, for goodness sake. Price tags. Too expensive, too cheap. How much money have I got in my account? Teddy bears that smell of perfume. We're not children any more. I hated my childhood. Stop pushing me, you old hag. She might like that. Let go of it! She looks like a badger. I must get something to eat, mustn't forget to call Mum on Skype. Stop grinning at me. I'd like to punch you in the face. I want chocolate.

She likes necklaces, how about that one? It’s tacky. I hate gold, I really do. I could buy her some chocolate? God I’m so hot, I need to get this woolly jumper off. I could have gone online shopping: this is like shopping in a jungle. Poor woman she’s got four small children. Brats. Maybe she would like My Little Pony? Oh, she does love Hello Magazine, ouch I cut myself.

I wonder what Mum and Dad will get me for Christmas. Walking in a winter wonderland... I want a cream cracker with cheese and a big glass of wine. Five pounds, ten pounds. I need a cup of tea. I wish it were Halloween so I could scare you people to death! Maybe she would like a parrot; she loves birds. I need to find some gift paper.

Why is there war in Syria? My stomach is rumbling even louder. I should do my secret Santa as well. What will she get me? Something really nice, maybe. I shouldn't spend my money on her, she hates me. Why does Frodo Baggins leave the shire? Why don’t I leave this shop? I should get her a card. Not much choice, half-naked men with Christmas hats covering their privates, good grief. I should go the gym more often. Maybe a card with holly on it. Christmassy. Tick, tock, damn you stupid clock. Maybe a tube of lip-gloss? She hates pink. I need to take my dog for a walk. She likes music. I must tidy my room. Maybe a perfume that smells of apples? I need some new socks. Her favourite colour is blue.

Another Christmas song! Play something else. I could get her an iTunes gift card? I must stop biting my nails. Getting darker outside. Gloves? She does like hand cream. I need a longer skirt. So many creams. I hate goats. Essay. I must charge my Mac. I could get her the One Direction DVD. Why did Taylor dump Harry? Earrings too big. Maybe I should colour my hair blue. She hates big rings. I wish I could dance like Jennifer Lopez. I know she will comment if it is cheap. I’m starving. A Dalek poster? I should eat more fruit and veg. It’s Christmas, I could get her a box of Quality Street. Miley Cyrus is such a slut. This will do. She will gain weight. I would really like to go to Australia one day. Just five minutes till closing time. I should have got a handbag. Why does my advent calendar have such small chocolates? Do I want a bag? Debit card in. Money paid. Why is she smiling? I need to go to bed earlier. Remove card. God he's breathing heavily. Your breath stinks. Thank you. My clothes need to be washed. Will she like her present?

Damn, I forgot my woolly hat. My scarf is strangling me. Christmas songs on the brain. I must find a man. Two hundred words to go on the essay. I must exercise in January. I must get a new coat, what are you looking at? I’m starving. I need to sit down. I’m broke. Stop singing at me, stupid children's choir. Should I take a Master? Would that help? I hate snow. My life sucks. That bench looks horrible. Man in Santa suit is winking at me. He is! Dirty old man. Oh damn, my feet are aching. Spoiled brat. Stop staring at me, kid. My favourite programme is on, damn it. God I'm glad I don't live on campus any more. I love karaoke. I need a small shot of vodka. I need to pee. I must remember to buy more bread. Fifty pence on the ground, I’m rich, I must leave it where I found it. My headaches are getting worse; nobody likes me.

I will finish the essay tonight. Bibliography. Keats or Austen? I must diet, no I’m thin enough, come on move. I hate walking past choirs, singing holy this and holy that, why don’t you just shut up, wow the Christmas tree is beautiful. I love that dress in the window. I forgot my gloves. Who cares? Mum. I must buy a new printer. I don’t want to go home, I hate you all. My ankle! Ouch, that hurt, please don’t look at me, I must look stupid. Oh God, there he comes... He hasn’t even noticed me. I hate that bimbo. I need to get up the hill. I’m so out of shape. I hate you drunks. I need a drink. I wonder what would happen if I lay down and died? They wouldn’t care. Stupid feet, stop aching, I must find another bench, God bless the person who put benches here. I’m so hungry, stomach please stop rumbling. I want something sweet. Stupid lid. God, that Quality Street is good.

continue reading "Stress"

Saturday, March 8, 2014

Eternal Love





Eternal Love

By:Shreyanshu(storystar.com)
Image/s by:(youthvoices.net)

Eternal Love

“I have only got a couple of months left, George”, said Samantha.” Then we should make those count.” -I said, optimistically. She smiled. I kissed her forehead and asked her to take rest. I left the room, peeking at her placid, yet beautiful face, while closing the door.”How much time have we got,Doctor”-I asked. “A month, if she really holds on.” -He said in a sad tone. I nodded and left for a cup of coffee.

I was in love with her, so much that I never wanted her to leave. She woke up next morning and was discharged from the hospital. In the car, she spoke- “George, will you keep loving me they way you always have?” I looked at her reassuringly and spoke- “Yes, always and forever. On reaching home, I told her that we had only a month left. She collapsed into my arms. “Only a month, that’s too fast.” ”Your cancer has reached level-3.” I said. She burst into tears. I reassured her that we would make the most out of this last month.

We ate dinner, in silence and then decided to take rest. I held her tight, as tight as I could without hurting her. We slept after an hour. It was 2:00 AM, I think, my hand felt cold. I ignored it for the first time, but when the feeling did not go, I checked. ”Samantha?” I murmered, “Did you turn the AC on?” She didn’t reply. I asked again. Still, didn’t get any reply. A chill crept up my spine. I knew what was wrong, I sat up and saw Samantha. Still and.... lifeless. I screamed- “SAMANTHA!!?” and I didn’t hear anything except the echo of my own scream. A pallor was spread across her face, and her eyes were still. The way, they are when death, engulfs the soul of a being. I immediately called for an ambulance. I met the doctor at the hospital and asked- “What happened?”. He replied- “I am really sorry for you loss, George.” I couldn’t contain myself, and yelled- “YOU SAID WE HAD MONTH!” ”I kno—“, I cut him in between and screamed- “A MONTH YOU MORON!”. “Calm down, George”- The doctor replied. I pushed him aside and started walking, not knowing where I will go.

The funeral was held the same week, with all of her close ones coming and paying their respects. I was silent during the ceremony. It was as if my life had been lost, as if, my soul was empty.

Months passed and I had given up on everything. I did not know why, I was still living. I didn’t reply to calls, didn’t leave the house and stayed in front of the TV all day, hoping that it would somehow, fill the loneliness- the void cause by Samantha’s death.

6 months passed. I though to myself- “Is this what Samantha would have wanted?” and evey part of my soul screamed- “No!”. I gathered all my courage, and went outside. After months, I breathed fresh air, Heard the birds chirping, felt the cool wind filter through my hair. I felt good. I started trekking, which had always been my passion. I renewed contact with all of my friends and now I was feeling, normal.

But still, there was this part of my soul that was lost that night when Samantha died.

A year passed. Everything seemed nice now. But I was afraid, of the fact that if everything seemed nice, then did it mean, that I had moved on? I didn’t intend to. Did it mean our love was not strong enough? These questions always haunted me. After a year and a half, I met another girl, named ‘Sally’. She was beautiful, brainy and passionate about her life. I admired that. We dated for a while, but weren’t on the same mental plane to take the relationship further.

I met many such girl in the next 2 years, and it never worked out. One night, I thought as to why all of my relationships were failing. I pondered for hours, brainstorming continuously and then it struck to me. Samantha was so close to me that she had become a part of my soul, whichever girl I dated I always tried to find Samantha in her.

Subconsciously, I always compared them to Samantha. She was perfect, in every sense, so no girl could ever compete to that. Hence, I was never satisfied which led to all the break-ups.

I breathed. I went outside, looked up at the sky, and saw millions of stars twinkling. I thought- 'One of them would be Samantha, looking down upon me every day, every moment,' and I came across a feeling, feeling of inner-peace which I was maybe, trying to feel by dating all of those women. By filling the void, which was irreparable.

I knew I could never fall in love with another woman. My heart belonged to only one person, Samantha.

I looked up and said- “Samantha, I will be yours, forever.”

continue reading "Eternal Love"

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

The Elephant's Child





The Elephant's Child

By:Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936)(classicshorts.com)
Image/s by:(mrwallpaper.com)

The Elephant's Child from Just So Stories

In the High and Far-Off Times the Elephant, O Best Beloved, had no trunk. He had only a blackish, bulgy nose, as big as a boot, that he could wriggle about from side to side; but he couldn't pick up things with it. But there was one Elephant--a new Elephant--an Elephant's Child--who was full of 'satiable curtiosity, and that means he asked ever so many questions. And he lived in Africa, and he filled all Africa with his 'satiable curtiosities. He asked his tall aunt, the Ostrich, why her tail-feathers grew just so, and his tall aunt the Ostrich spanked him with her hard, hard, claw. He asked his tall uncle, the Giraffe, what made his skin spotty, and his tall uncle, the Giraffe, spanked him with his hard, hard hoof. And still he was full of 'satiable curtiosity! He asked his broad aunt, the Hippopotamus, why her eyes were red, and his broad aunt, the Hippopotamus, spanked him with her broad, broad hoof; and he asked his hairy uncle, the Baboon, why melons tasted just so, and his hairy uncle, the Baboon, spanked him with his hairy, hairy paw. And still he was full of 'satiable curtiosity! He asked questions about everything that he saw, or heard, or felt, or smelt, or touched, and all his uncles and his aunts spanked him. And still he was full of 'satiable curtiosity!

One fine morning in the middle of the Precession of the Equinoxes this 'satiable Elephant's Child asked a new fine question that he had never asked before. He asked, "What does the crocodile have for dinner?" Then everybody said, "Hush!" in a loud and dretful tone, and they spanked him immediately and directly, without stopping, for a long time.

By and by, when that was finished, he came upon Kolokolo Bird sitting in the middle of a wait-a-bit thornbush, and he said, "My father has spanked me, and my mother has spanked me; all my aunts and uncles have spanked me for my 'satiable curtiosity; and still I want to know what the Crocodile has for dinner!"

The Kolokolo Bird said, with a mournful cry, "Go to the banks of the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees, and find out."

That very next morning, when there was nothing left of the Equinoxes, because the Precession had preceded according to precedent, this 'satiable Elephant's Child took a hundred pounds of bananas the little short red kind, and a hundred pounds of sugar-cane the long purple kind, and seventeen melons the greeny-crackly kind, and said to all his dear families, "Good-bye. I am going to the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees, to find out what the Crocodile has for dinner." And they all spanked him once more for luck, though he asked them most politely to stop.

Then he went away, a little warm, but not at all astonished, eating melons, and throwing the rind about, because he could not pick it up.

He went from Graham's Town to Kimberley, and from Kimberley to Khama's Country, and from Khama's Country he went east by north, eating melons all the time, till at last he came to the banks of the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees, precisely as Kolokolo Bird had said.

Now you must know and understand, O Best Beloved, that till that very week, and day, and hour, and minute, this 'satiable Elephant's Child had never seen a Crocodile, and did not know what one was like. It was all his 'satiable curiosity.

The first thing that he found was a Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake curled around a rock.

"'Scuse me," said the Elephant's Child most politely, "but have you seen such a thing as a Crocodile in these promiscuous parts?"

"Have I seen a crocodile?" said the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake, in a voice of dretful scorn. "What will you ask me next?"

"'Scuse me," said the Elephant's Child, "but could you kindly tell me what he has for dinner?"

Then the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake uncoiled himself very quickly from the rock, and spanked the Elephant's Child with his scalesome, flailsome tail.

"That is odd," said the Elephant's Child, "because my father and mother, and my uncle and my aunt, not to mention my other aunt, the Hippopotamus, and my other uncle, the Baboon, have all spanked me for my 'satiable curtiosity--and I suppose this is the same thing."

So he said good-bye very politely to the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake, and helped to coil him up on the rock again, and went on, a little warm, but not at all astonished, eating melons, and throwing the rind about, because he could not pick it up, till he trod on what he thought was a log of wood at the very edge of the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees.

But it was really the Crocodile, O Best Beloved, and the Crocodile winked one eye--like this!

"'Scuse me," said the Elephant's Child most politely, "but do you happen to have seen a Crocodile in these promiscuous parts?"

Then the Crocodile winked the other eye, and lifted half his tail out of the mud; and the Elephant's Child stepped back most politely, because he did not wish to be spanked again.

"Come hither, Little One," said the Crocodile. "Why do you ask such things?"

"'Scuse me," said the Elephant's Child most politely, "But my father has spanked me, my mother has spanked me, not to mention my tall aunt, the Ostrich, and my tall uncle, the Giraffe, who can kick ever so hard, as well as my broad aunt, the Hippopotamus, and my hairy uncle, the Baboon, and including the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake, with the scalesome, flailsome tail, just up the bank, who spanks harder than any of them; and so, if it's quite all the same to you, I don't want to be spanked any more."

"Come hither, Little One," said the Crocodile, "for I am the Crocodile," and he wept crocodile tears to show it was quite true.

Then the Elephants' child grew all breathless, and panted, and kneeled down on the bank and said, "You are the very person I have been looking for all these long days. Will you please tell me what you have for dinner?"

"Come hither, Little One," said the Crocodile, "and I'll whisper."

Then the Elephant's Child put his head down close to the Crocodile's musky, tusky mouth, and the Crocodile caught him by his little nose, which up to that very week, day, hour, and minute, had been no bigger than a boot, though much more useful.

"I think," said the Crocodile--and he said it between his teeth, like this--"I think to-day I will begin with Elephant's Child!"

At this, O Best Beloved, the Elephant's Child was much annoyed, and he said, speaking through his nose, like this, "Led go! You are hurting be!"

Then the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake scuffled down from the bank and said, "My young friend, if you do not now, immediately and instantly, pull as hard as ever you can, it is my opinion that your acquaintance in the large-pattern leather ulster" and by this he meant the Crocodile "will jerk you into yonder limpid stream before you can say Jack Robinson."

This is the way Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake always talked.

Then the Elephant's child sat back on his little haunches, and pulled, and pulled, and pulled, and his nose began to stretch. And the Crocodile floundered into the water, making it all creamy with great sweeps of his tail, and he pulled, and pulled, and pulled.

And the Elephant's Child's nose kept on stretching; and the Elephant's child spread all his little four legs and pulled, and pulled, and pulled, and his nose kept on stretching; and the Crocodile threshed his tail like an oar, and he pulled, and pulled, and pulled, and at each pull the Elephant's Child's nose grew longer and longer--and it hurt him hijjus!!

Then the Elephant's Child felt his legs slipping, and he said through his nose, which was now nearly five feet long, "This is to butch for be!"

Then the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake came down from the bank, and knotted himself in a double-clove-hitch round the Elephant's Child's hind legs, and said, "Rash and inexperienced traveller, we will now seriously devote ourselves to a little high tension, because if we do not, it is my impression that yonder self-propelling man-of-war with the armour-plated upper deck" and by this, O Best Beloved, he meant the Crocodile "will permanently vitiate your future career."

That is the way all Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snakes always talk.

So he pulled, and the Elephant's Child pulled, and the Crocodile pulled, but the Elephant's Child and the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake pulled hardest; and at last the Crocodile let go of the Elephant's Child's nose with a plop that you could hear all up and down the Limpopo.

Then the Elephant's Child sat down most hard and sudden; but first he was careful to say "Thank you" to the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake; and next he was kind to his poor pulled nose, and wrapped it all up in cool banana leaves, and hung it in the great grey-green greasy Limpopo to cool.

"What are you doing that for?" said the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake.

"'Scuse me," said the Elephant's Child, "but my nose is badly out of shape, and I am waiting for it to shrink."

"Then you will have to wait a long time," said the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake. "Some people do not know what is good for them."

The Elephant's Child sat there for three days waiting for his nose to shrink. But it never grew any shorter, and, besides, it made him squint. For, O Best Beloved, you will understand that the Crocodile had pulled it out into a really truly trunk, same as all Elephant's have today.

At the end of the third day a fly came and stung him on the shoulder, and before he knew what he was doing he lifted up his trunk and hit that fly dead with the end of it.

"'Vantage number one!" said the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake. "You couldn't have done that with a mere-smear nose. Try and eat a little now."

Before he thought what he was doing the Elephant's Child put out his trunk and plucked a large bundle of grass, dusted it clean against his forelegs, and stuffed it into his mouth.

"'Vantage number two!" said the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake. "You couldn't have done that with a mere-smear nose. Don't you think the sun is very hot here?"

"It is," said the Elephant's Child, and before he thought what he was doing he schlooped up a schloop of mud from the banks of the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo, and slapped it on his head, where it made a cool schloopy-sloshy mud-cap all trickly behind his ears.

"'Vantage number three!" said the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake. "You couldn't have done that with a mere-smear nose. Now how do you feel about being spanked again?"

"'Scuse me," said the Elephant's Child, "but I should not like it at all."

"How would you like to spank somebody?" said the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake.

"I should like it very much indeed," said the Elephant's Child.

"Well," said the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake, "you will find that new nose of yours very useful to spank people with."

"Thank you," said the Elephant's child, "I'll remember that; and now I think I'll go home to all my dear families and try."

So the Elephant's Child went home across Africa frisking and whisking his trunk. When he wanted fruit to eat he pulled fruit down from a tree, instead of waiting for it to fall as he used to do. When he wanted grass he plucked grass up from the ground, instead of going on his knees as he used to do. When the flies bit him he broke off the branch of a tree and used it as a fly-whisk; and he made himself a new, cool slushy-squshy mud-cap whenever the sun was hot. When he felt lonely walking through Africa he sang to himself down his trunk, and the noise was louder than several brass bands. He went especially out of his way to find a broad Hippopotamus she was no relation of his, and he spanked her very hard, to make sure that the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake had spoken the truth about his new trunk. The rest of the time he picked up the melon rinds that he had dropped on his way to the Limpopo--for he was a Tidy Pachyderm.

One dark evening he came back to all his dear families, and he coiled up his trunk and said, "How do you do?" They were very glad to see him, and immediately said, "Come here and be spanked for your 'satiable curtiosity."

"Pooh," said the Elephant's Child. "I don't think you people's know anything about spanking; but I do, and I'll show you."

Then he uncurled his trunk and knocked two of his dear brothers head over heels.

"O Bananas!" said they, "Where did you learn that trick, and what have you done to your nose?"

"I got a new one from the Crocodile on the banks of the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River," said the Elephant's Child. "I asked him what he had for dinner, and he gave me this to keep."

"It looks very ugly," said his hairy uncle, the Baboon.

"It does," said the Elephant's Child. "But it's very useful," and he picked up his hairy uncle, the Baboon, by one hairy leg, and hove him into a hornets' nest.

Then that bad Elephant's Child spanked all his dear families for a long time, till they were very warm and greatly astonished. He pulled out his tall Ostrich aunt's tail-feathers; and he caught his tall uncle, the Giraffe, by the hind-leg, and dragged him through a thorn-bush; and he shouted at his broad aunt, the Hippopotamus, and blew bubbles into her ear when she was sleeping in the water after meals; but he never let any one touch the Kolokolo Bird.

At last things grew so exciting that his dear families went off one by one in a hurry to the banks of the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees, to borrow new noses from the Crocodile. When they came back nobody spanked anybody any more; and ever since that day, O Best Beloved, all the Elephants you will ever see besides all those that you won't, have trunks precisely like the trunk of the 'satiable Elephant's Child.

continue reading "The Elephant's Child"
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